FREE SHIPPING


OUR AUCTIONS

&

GUIDES


Subscribe to our feed.


HOW TO SUBMIT

YOUR POSTERS


HOW TO PACKAGE & SHIP POSTERS


PAYMENT OPTIONS


PAYMENT PLAN AVAILABLE


APPRAISALS AUTHENTICATIONS


WE CAN GET ANY POSTER


NEW INVENTORY


GIFT CERTIFICATES


ABOUT FOLDED POSTERS


LIMITED EDITIONS?

THE NSS NUMBER


RESTORATION


REPRODUCTIONS


FLAWS / DEFECTS


BEWARE OF FAKES


CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY


JOIN OUR EMAIL LIST


REFERENCES &

CUSTOMER

TESTIMONIALS


OUR SHOWROOM


COMMON SIZES

U.S.A.

1sh  1 Sheet 27"x41"

Ins  Insert 14"x36"

3sh  3 Sheet 41"x81"

1/2 Sheet  22"x28"

NON U.S.A.

British Quad  30"x40"

Aust. Daybill 13"x30"

French 1 Panel 47"x63

 Italian 1sh  28"x39"

 Italian 2sh  39"x55"

 Italian 4sh  55"x78"


CONDITION

 C10  M  Mint

 C9  NM  Near Mint

 C8 EX Very Fine

 C7  Fine/Very Good

 C6  Very Good

 C5  Good/Very Good


COMMON DEFINITIONS

 ORIG MOVIE POSTER

 ADVANCE or TEASER

 NSS       NSS NUMBER

STUDIO ISSUE

 REISSUE/RERELEASE

 RESTORATION

 LINEN BACKING

 DOUBLE-SIDED (D/S)

 TRI-FOLD


ADULT X

AUDREY HEPBURN

DISNEY / ANIMATION

AUTO RACING HOT ROD

BAD GIRL & PIN UP

BEATLES

BIKER GANG MOTORCYCLE

BOWERY BOYS

BRIGITTE BARDOT  

CIRCUS

ELVIS

FRENCH

GODFATHER

HITCHCOCK

HORROR & MONSTER

ITALIAN

JAMES BOND

MARILYN MONROE

PLANET OF THE APES

ROCK POSTERS

ROLLING STONES

SCIENCE FICTION

SEXPLOITATION

STAR WARS

SURFING & BEACH

WESTERN


RemoteRack

Remote Control Holder


HIGH DEFINITION MOVIE POSTER DISPLAY



L.A.M.P. SPONSOR

 2004-2011

LEARN ABOUT

MOVIE POSTERS

 

 

Our Blog

 

TWITTER

 

Home

 

 

 

 

 

The following terms and definitions are used when describing movie posters.

 

For definitions of movie poster sizes (one sheets, inserts, etc.) click here.

 

ORIGINAL MOVIE POSTER (U.S.)

A poster that was issued for a movie by the National Screen Service (NSS), or by a movie studio, or by another company authorized by the studio for display in an actual movie theatre or for promotional use at the time of the films original release. Posters that were made to be sold to the public in stores or on line are reproductions/reprints and are NOT original movie posters, even if they were printed around the time of the films release.

Older posters prior to the mid 1980's were usually (not always) issued folded while newer posters are always issued rolled. Vintage original movie posters were normally printed in very limited quantities, thus they are usually pretty rare. All of them were not meant to be saved. After their initial use they were supposed to be returned to the studio or destroyed.

Usually, the older the poster, the rarer it is. Authentic original movie posters usually contain an NSS information tag/paragraph and number. However, this is not always true. There are plenty of original movie posters that do not contain NSS info. And, to complicate matters, just because a poster has an NSS tagline, NSS number, and a GAU (printer's union) logo, does not necessarily mean it is an original movie poster. There are many fakes and reprints that have this printed on them to make them appear more authentic.

 

How can you tell if a movie poster is "original" "real" "authentic"?

 

Studio (non NSS) issued posters are also considered original. These were a different print run at the time of the films initial release often printed directly for or by the studio for promotion and as giveaways to industry insiders. Not necessarily for use in an actual theater, but sometimes they did make their way there. May differ slightly or be exactly the same as the NSS printing (except for NSS tag and number at the bottom). In many cases these are rarer than the NSS issued poster.

Common standard sizes include: One Sheet 27"x41" or 27"x40", Insert 14"x36", Half Sheet 22"x28", Three Sheet 41"x81", Lobby Card 11"x14", Window Card 14"x22". Measurements on these can vary slightly, but usually by no more than a half inch or so.

Common Reproduction sizes (not original movie posters) are: 24"x36", 20"x30", 11"x17" and anything slightly less than a standard size one sheet approx. 26"x39".

The above information applies to U.S. posters. Foreign movie posters have different specs/sizes.

 

OUT OF HOME posters are also original movie posters.

 

ORIGINAL MOVIE POSTER (NON U.S.)

Each country has their own specifications and standard sizes. The following can generally be said about most foreign movie posters: A poster that was issued for a movie by a movie studio, or by another company authorized by the studio for display in an actual movie theatre or for promotional use at the time of the films original release. Older posters prior to the mid 1980's were usually (not always) issued folded while newer posters are issued rolled and/or folded. Original non U.S. movie posters are printed in limited quantities, thus they are usually pretty rare. Usually, the older the poster, the rarer it is.

 

ADVANCE
Issued well in advance (usually many months) of a film's release. Usually a one sheet. Very often similar to the regular issue but with an added line of text like "Coming This Christmas".

 

TEASER

Issued before a film is released. Usually a one sheet. Designed to pique interest "teasing" by showing very little. Very often contains plain text or a single picture without text. Usually rarer than the regular issues.

 

INTERNATIONAL STYLE
A poster made in the U.S. for international use. Often featuring different artwork, but sometimes they use almost the same exact artwork/design. Sometimes the artwork/photos are more risqué and sometimes they feature an alternate title. Usually lacks a RATING (G, PG, or R) because foreign countries do not use the U.S. movie ratings system.

 

STYLE A,B,C,D

Studios often issued many different styles of one sheets for the same movie. They still do. To differentiate them they were often marked as "Style A" or "Style B" etc.

 

NSS (National Screen Service)

From 1939 until the mid-1980’s the NSS distributed almost 90% of all American movie posters. During the 1960's and 70's they had at least 6 regional print shops: New Jersey, Cleveland, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Wichita, and Dallas. They produced, printed, distributed and stocked all of the materials for most of the major movie studios. NSS was bought out by Technicolor, Inc. in 2000. Movie studios mostly now print and distribute their own advertising materials.

 

 

NSS NUMBER

 

THE NSS NUMBER DOES NOT INDICATE THAT YOUR POSTER IS A "LIMITED EDITION"

 

The National Screen Service (NSS) established a dating and coding system for movie posters. Each movie was assigned ONE NSS number. If a movie was re released several years after the initial release, sometimes a new NSS number was assigned, usually with an "R" in front of it. The NSS number appears on almost all material that was distributed through them. On one sheets it usually appears somewhere in the bottom right side margin. They also sometimes stamped the back of a poster with the title and NSS number. If a poster is from the NSS era and does not have an NSS number, it may be a reproduction. In the examples shown below, Back to the Future was the 64th movie processed by NSS in 1985, Rear Window was the 337th in 1954, and Jaws was the 155th in 1975. Many people mistakenly think movie posters are "numbered/limited editions". We see this all the time! The Rear Window poster was NOT the 54th out of 337 printed! All original U.S. posters issued for Rear Window have the same 54-337 NSS number.

 

 

 

 

 

All U.S. Back to the Future posters have the same NSS # 850064, all Rear Window posters have the same NSS # 54-337, and all Jaws posters have the NSS # 75/155.

 

QUESTION: I'VE SEEN 2 POSTERS FOR THE SAME TITLE WITH SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT LAYOUTS OF THE NSS INFO. ON THE BOTTOM. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? Throughout the 1960's-1980's it was common for posters to be printed at several different NSS facilities around the U.S. There were often slight differences in the NSS number layout on the bottom of the poster. Also, sometimes if a movie was extremely popular like JAWS or STAR WARS and more posters were needed, there were additional print runs made and sometimes the layout on the bottom was changed slightly.

 

 

NSS STAMP

NSS stamped the back of most posters from the 1940's through the mid 1970's.

 

 

NSS TAG

National Screen Service also included a tag across the bottom of the poster:

 

Property of National Screen Service Corporation -Licensed for use only in connection with the exhibition of this picture at the theatre licensing this material. Licensee agrees not to trade, sell or give it away, or permit others to use it, nor shall licensee be entitled to any credit upon return of this material. This material either must be returned or destroyed immediately after use.

 

NSS SECOND PRINTING

or RE-STRIKE

A poster that was printed by NSS for poster dealers (or for other purposes) after a movies original release (sometimes many years after). May differ slightly or be exactly the same as the first NSS printing. NOT AN ORIGINAL MOVIE POSTER! Usually you can tell it is not, but sometimes it is next to impossible to tell. There were many re-strikes for popular 70s and 80's movies like Star Wars, Jaws, Blade Runner, Raiders of the Lost Ark, etc. Because of all the re-strikes for these popular titles, finding an original for these can be quite a challenge.

 

UNAUTHORIZED RESTRIKE

A poster that was printed illegally using the original printing plates. NOT AN ORIGINAL MOVIE POSTER. Not intended for theater use. Done by criminals to try and pass off as originals to unsuspecting buyers/collectors. The most well known example of this was done in the 1980's for the Star Wars style A, B, and C one sheets. There are usually flaws in these restrikes from dust/dirt that show up as specks or "hairs". There also may be subtle differences like missing logos, words, printer's marks, etc. Please see our Articles page for more details.

 

STUDIO ISSUE

An original movie poster, usually an ADVANCE, that a movie studio issued or had printed directly (sometimes without NSS) during the time of the films initial release. May differ slightly or be exactly the same as the first NSS printing. In many cases these are rarer than the NSS issued poster. Usually distributed rolled not folded, but we have seen folded ones on occasion. Usually do not contain the NSS number and paragraph on the bottom, but sometimes they are present.

 

STUDIO ISSUED ONE SHEETS are considered original. These were a different print run at the time of the films initial release often printed directly for or by the studio for promotion and as giveaways to industry insiders. Not necessarily for use in an actual theater, but sometimes they did make their way there. Usually the bottom border is blank with no NSS info., but sometimes they included an NSS number without the NSS paragraph.

 

 

GAU LOGO 

The GAU printers union logo appears on most (not all) original U.S. theatrical posters from the 1970's through the 1980's. It started appearing around 1972. It is very small and usually found on the lower white border in the center. If a poster is from this era and does not have a GAU logo, it may (or may not) be a reproduction.

 

 

RE-ISSUE or RE-RELEASE

When a movie is re-released years after its original first showing, a new poster is usually printed for the theatres. These are considered real and original, however they generally are less desirable than the regular first year of issue poster. These can still be very valuable and quite collectible. Not the same as a "REPRINT".

 

 

REPRINT or FAKE (Bootleg)

Not issued by the studio for theatrical display. Not original, not valuable, not collectible! They are however found everywhere. Most are similar in size to one sheets or inserts. Some reprints are authorized by the studio, these usually differ though significantly from the real studio issues and are easy to spot. There are however unscrupulous printers, mostly overseas, that try and copy the real studio issued posters EXACTLY. THESE ARE FAKES! They now even print double sided in an attempt to fool the collecting novice. Usually easy to spot due to subtle differences in size and printing quality, although examples exist that are meant to deceive, including popular titles such as Jaws, all the Star Wars movies, Raiders of the lost Ark, Raging Bull, Apocalypse Now, Taxi Driver, Blade Runner, Scarface and others. Even some of the newer popular titles like “Spiderman” and “The Matrix” have fakes and reprints. BEWARE! Remember, not all "reprints" are "fakes". Some reprints are authorized. Unauthorized reprints that are meant to deceive collectors by copying originals almost exactly ARE FAKES (Bootlegs).

 

 

REPRODUCTION

Not issued by a movie studio for theatrical display. Not original, not valuable, not collectible! Reproductions exist for almost all popular titles. They are usually (but not always!) marked by the company that made them, differ slightly in size from originals, and are easy to spot. For example: years ago, Portal Publications was a company that reproduced MANY popular older posters. These were licensed, but since some of them are actually 30 to 50 years old some people mistake them for original movie posters. Many titles over the last 30 years have also been reproduced, legally and illegally. Again, these are usually easy to spot by an informed collector. Some valuable posters however have been reproduced with the intent to deceive. Beware! Several times a week we receive email photos of posters featuring titles/genres such as Frankenstein, Charlie Chaplin, Shirley Temple Breakfast at Tiffany's, Jailhouse Rock, Star Wars, James Bond, etc. They appear to be very old. They are usually rolled, never folded. 90% of them turn out to be reproductions from the 1960's or 70's. A lot of older reproductions even copied the NSS info. and old copyright date on the bottom of the poster to make them appear more authentic! For example: We have had dozens of people send us photos over the years of rolled never folded Breakfast at Tiffany's one sheets that say copyright 1961 with an NSS number on the bottom. They always start out by saying "Oh, I know it is real". They are reproductions.

 

PORTAL PUBLICATIONS

If you have a poster that says "Portal Publications" on the bottom it is a reproduction with little to no real value. It is NOT an original movie poster printed for use in a theater. They are smaller than a typical one sheet and usually measure 20"x29" or 24"x36".

 

RESTORATION

The process by which a poster is restored as close as possible to its original appearance. Specially trained artisans use a variety of methods to remove or disguise stains, fix holes and tears, replace missing paper, clean, enhance color, perform image recreation, and touch up fold lines. Nowadays since many techniques used have approached perfection, it is almost impossible to tell when a poster has been restored. If a poster has had any restoration we try to describe it as best as possible. Restoration can actually increase a posters value. Most of our posters that have had restoration have only had very minimal work done (touching up fold lines).

 

LINEN BACKING

Linen backing can dramatically improve the overall appearance of a poster and it can substantially increase its value. It is an archival poster conservation method where the poster is de-acidified and mounted with wheat paste onto acid free paper and adhered to canvas. This process provides stability to the piece and prevents possible deterioration. It smoothes and flattens out waves and wrinkles and makes creases and folds much less noticeable (sometimes invisible). If needed, restoration can then be done. Once linen backed, a poster is easier to handle, is ready for framing, or it may be rolled for shipping. If not framing a linen backed poster, we recommend storing it flat and not rolled. Should a linen backed poster sustain physical damage in the future, poster removal is possible. This cannot be said for most other mounting methods. Linen backing is not absolutely necessary for most posters, but for a valuable one it is a good idea because it helps to preserve it. We have our posters linen backed by world renowned paper conservation professionals. They do work for all the major movie studios and museums.

 

PAPER BACKING
A poster conservation method. When a poster has been "paperbacked" it has been professionally mounted onto a piece of high quality Japanese rice paper, and then onto a piece of acid-free backing board. During this process, almost all of the posters defects have been corrected (or greatly minimized), and if the backing was done by a talented professional, the poster looks great. THIS IS A PROCESS SIMILAR TO "LINEN BACKING", but it is usually reserved for CARD STOCK posters (inserts, half-sheets, lobby cards, and window cards) where the poster remains in a form similar to how it was when it was unbacked (this is personal choice and not a matter of right or wrong).

 

STARCH BACKING
A poster conservation method. When a poster has been starch backed it has been flattened, cleaned and de-acidified. Minor touch up is optional as the fold lines will usually still be noticeable. It is NOT mounted to anything once completed. Recommended only for posters that are in NM condition before the process and those of a strong stock paper with fold lines that are NOT weak.

 

GEL SIZING

A proprietary minimally invasive poster conservation method (patent pending). When a poster has gone through the Gel Sizing process, it has been flattened, cleaned and de-acidified. The paper is impregnated with a purified form of sea gelatin which greatly strengthens the paper and physically eliminates creases and fold lines. It is NOT mounted to anything once completed, and the finished poster will remain dimensionally stable even after exposure to changes in atmospheric conditions.  A brand new type of conservation pioneered in 2005 by John Davis.

 

PRINTER'S PROOF

Before a poster is printed in large quantities, the printer prints a limited number of test posters. Commonly, they leave the color chart on the edge of the poster. Sometimes they print in a single color or a combination of just a few colors. These are then shown to people in a position to "OK" them. Once they are approved, the final posters are printed and the proofs normally are destroyed. A printer's proof is far more rare than a regular one sheet poster, and there is no fear of purchasing a reproduction.

 

DOUBLE-SIDED (D/S)

In the early 1990's some studios started issuing movie posters that were printed on both sides. This process makes the poster stand out more in a theatre light box display. Today, most posters are printed with single sided and double sided versions. It is believed by some experts, although it is debatable, that recent STUDIO PRINTED posters that are double sided are "original" while single sided ones are not.

 

 

 

TRI-FOLD

Term used when referring to a one sheet. Most one sheets that were folded were done with three horizontal creases and one vertical. A tri-fold was never folded vertically. Very rare and very desirable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FILM NOIR

Literally 'black film or cinema' was coined by French film critics who noticed the trend of how dark and black the looks and themes were of many American crime and detective films released in France following the war. It is a style of American films that first evolved in the 1940s, became prominent in the post-war era, and lasted in a classic period until about 1960. Film noir films (mostly shot in gloomy grays, blacks and whites) show the dark and inhumane side of human nature with cynicism and doomed love, and they emphasize the brutal, unhealthy, seamy, shadowy, dark and sadistic sides of the human experience. An oppressive atmosphere of menace, pessimism, anxiety, suspicion that anything can go wrong, dingy realism, futility, fatalism, defeat and entrapment are stylized characteristics of film noir. The protagonists in film noir are normally driven by their past or by human weakness to repeat former mistakes. Examples include This Gun For Hire and Chinatown.

 

 

CRIME

Movie posters, generally from the 40's and '50s, that feature images or themes of "Crime". Highly collectible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BAD GIRL

Movie posters, generally from the '50s, that feature images or themes of "Bad Girls". Highly collectible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEXPLOITATION

Movie posters, generally from the '60s and '70's, that feature images or themes of a sexually explicit nature and exploit women. Adults Only. Highly collectible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BLAXPLOITATION

Movie posters, generally from the '70s, that feature images or themes of African American life. Famous examples include: Shaft, SuperFly, Blacula, Cleopatra Jones, Foxy Brown. Highly collectible.

 

 

 

 

 

ICONIC IMAGE

An image, usually from pop culture, that is instantly recognizable by the general public. Examples include:

The shark protruding from the water from Jaws.

John Travolta in his famous stance pointing skyward from Saturday Night Fever.

The black and white standing portrait of Al Pacino from Scarface.

The famous artwork of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh from Gone with the Wind.

 

LENTICULAR

Usually used on special edition one sheets. Produced on a thick plastic sheet usually about 3/16" thick. Very expensive to produce and thus very rare. It is a specialized printing process which is similar to but differs from a hologram. They look great in almost any kind of light. As you turn the poster an illusion of 3D motion is created. Some of the most famous and most collectible lenticulars are from The Lost World: Jurassic Park, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Spiderman 3, and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

MYLAR

Usually used on special limited edition one sheets. Printed on a sheet of mylar plastic. The plastic is then coated with either silver or gold paint and then the artwork is painted over the silver or gold paint, leaving holes to allow the silver or gold base paint to show through. Mylar posters are extremely colorful and attractive. Since this is an expensive process, these posters are printed in limited numbers. The most famous one is probably the Star Wars advance mylar, while a recent popular one was issued for the film Charlie's Angels.

 

ROLLED vs. FOLDED

Most U.S. and foreign paper movie posters (i.e. ONE SHEETS) prior to the mid 1980's were shipped to theatres folded (approx. folded size = 10 1/4 x 13 1/2). Cardboard stock posters (i.e. INSERTS) were issued both rolled and folded. Rarely were paper posters issued rolled making rolled ones from that era and before highly desirable. Today all U.S. posters are issued rolled while foreign posters are still mostly issued folded.

 

For example:

An original NM C9 ROLLED JAWS one sheet (if you can find one) can easily fetch $700.00 to $1,000.00.

A Tri-Fold NM C9 one is usually priced around $400 to $600.00.

A regular folded NM C9 usually goes for $250.00 to $400.00.

 

STONE LITHOGRAPHY
Characterized by their beautiful, rich, deep colors, hand printed Stone Litho film posters are treasured by movie poster aficionados. Most advertisement posters from the 1870s through the 1950s were printed by this method. The print run could have been from one hundred to a few thousand. Artists spent days drawing on special lithographic stones and printing on their lithograph press. Each color was drawn on a stone with crayons. The drawing was then fixed to the stone with acid. Ink was applied and then a sheet of paper was pressed on the stone. This was done repeatedly for each different color. This is a "lost art" and is rarely (almost never) used today. Recently, a company using this process recreated the top 100 film posters of all time in limited editions.

 

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

Refers to a poster that comes from the country where the film was made. These posters often command a premium over other posters from the movie. For example, the British Quad for Dr. No is generally more expensive than the U.S. one sheet for this title.

 

VIDEO POSTER
Usually very similar or sometimes virtually indistinguishable from Original theater issued one sheets. These posters were for video stores to advertise the movie being released on video tape, laser disc, or DVD.

 

OUT OF HOME

outdoor print advertising: billboards, kiosks, sun shelters, etc. Also includes other venues accessible to the public: malls, airports, transit systems, supermarkets, toy stores, etc. Distribution, format and sizes of out-of-home movie posters are separate from those displayed at theaters. The out-of-home media industry requires studios to rent display space whereas movie theaters do not. These are another form of original movie poster.

 

WILDING POSTER
Made to be pasted up outside in cities on construction sites etc. Sizes vary and they may have artwork the same or completely different than the one sheet. Can be very collectible and sometimes extremely rare.
Most do not survive because they are eventually pasted over with newer posters or destroyed by the elements.

 

FLAWS / DEFECTS

 

Please be aware that most movie posters were actually used at the theater and will contain slight imperfections like writing on the back, pin holes, fold wear, etc. These are all very common and to be expected, but, if they bother you, all these minor flaws can be remedied in the linen backing and restoration process.

 

FOLDED
Most vintage original movie posters prior to 1985 were issued folded. They came this way from the printer and it is NOT CONSIDERED A DEFECT!! The exceptions are Mylar one sheets and larger card stock posters which were issued rolled. If these are folded then it is a flaw. If there is an EXTRA FOLD in a one sheet, then it IS considered a defect.

 

FOLD SEPARATION
A tear along the fold line of a poster. A minor flaw unless it is a large tear. Not seen when displayed!!

 

FOLD WEAR
As a poster ages and is opened and closed over and over, the fold lines can get worn. Usually considered a minor flaw. Can be a major flaw if fold wear is heavy and a lot of white is showing.

 

FOXING
Small brown spots caused by age. Comes from tiny pieces of metal trapped in the paper during the printing process. Usually a very minor flaw, but it depends on the severity.

 

MOLD
Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

SNIPE

A small (usually) sticker with additional information that is added to an original movie poster by distributors or theater managers while the movie is still in its original release. It could contain an amended rating, a review, etc. Also used to cover up information that has changed or is inaccurate. A snipe is considered a very minor defect to most collectors, however it depends on its size, location, and whether it detracts from the original image or not. If it is large and distracting and can not be removed, then it is a major flaw.

 

HANDLING WEAR

General term used to describe a poster that has normal minor wear and tear like pinholes, fold separations, etc.

 

TEAR

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

CREASE

Depending on the severity and amount, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

WRINKLING

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

WAVINESS

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

BROWNING / TANNING

As paper ages, sometimes it turns brown. Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

FADING

Caused by sunlight. Depending on the severity, this is almost always a MAJOR flaw.

 

WATER/MOISTURE DAMAGE

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

MISSING PAPER

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

INSECT DAMAGE

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

PENCIL / PEN / CRAYON

Depending on the severity and whether it is on the front or the back, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

NSS STAMP BLEED THROUGH

Sometimes the NSS stamp on the back is visible from the front. Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw. Some consider this to be a "good" flaw since it is a very important part of the history of the poster and helps to determine it's authenticity if linen backed.

 

FOREIGN CENSOR STAMP

Sometimes, foreign countries stamped posters on the front. Usually, it is a circular stamp 1" to 3" in diameter. Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw. It depends on its size, location, and whether it detracts from the original image or not. If it is large and distracting and can not be removed, then it is a major flaw. Some consider this to be a "good" flaw since it is a very important part of the history of the poster and helps to determine it's authenticity.

 

TAPE

Depending on the severity and whether it is on the front or the back, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

STAIN

Depending on the severity, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

HOLE

Depending on the size, this can be a major or minor flaw.

 

PIN HOLE

A minor flaw unless there are more than a few of them and they are distracting.

 

STAPLE HOLE

A minor flaw unless there are more than a few of them and they are distracting.

 

 

 

 

HOME    VIRTUAL GALLERY    GRADING/CONDITION    DEFINITIONS    ARTICLES    U.S. SIZES    FOREIGN SIZES   LINKS   FRAMES   SEXPLOITATION

BLAXPLOITATION   LINEN BACKING    SHIPPING    SPECIAL ORDERS    JAMES BOND    STAR WARS    MARILYN MONROE    ELVIS    FRENCH    ITALIAN    ROCK  

 

© 2014, CineMasterpieces.com

 

CineMasterpieces.com           StarWarsPosters.net          JamesBondPosters.net

 

      ElvisMoviePosters.com    MarilynMonroeMoviePosters.com       FrenchMoviePosters.net     ItalianMoviePosters.net

    

BeDecked.com          Be-Decked.com          DenimJewelry.com         JeanJewelry.com